• ACLF Northwest is a community-based, nonprofit organization that trains and supports the leadership
    and civic engagement of
    Asian Pacific Islanders with a commitment to social justice, community empowerment and public service.

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Now Accepting Community Leaders Program Applications!

CLP graduation dinner photo

The 2013 Community Leaders Program class at their graduation dinner.

ACLF is now accepting applications to the 2014 Community Leaders Program.

Visit our program page for more information about the Community Leaders Program and to download the application.

Our 2013 Community Leaders Program Class

RaulRaul Alicdan is a Filipino-American, born in the Philippines and raised in Guam. He moved to Seattle for school and majored in International Business and Spanish, before going into marketing and finance. He realized he wanted to join the social service sector and worked with the Medic One Foundation and Powerful Voices before earning his Masters in Public Administration. Upon graduation, Raul joined the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, a legal aid organization that helps low-income immigrants. Raul volunteers for the Community Health Plan of WA, Powerful Voices, the American Red Cross, in his spare time and supports organizations that promote youth empowerment and social justice. In his spare time, Raul likes to hang out with his partner and friends on Capitol Hill for underground electronic music shows and good food.

 

Leigh-Anne

Leigh-Anne Chung is Korean American and a Federal Way native. After attending the University of Washington she received her B.A. in American Ethnic Studies with a focus on Asian Americans, and a minor in Human Rights. After graduation, she served as an Interpretive Lead for The Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific Experience, informing and learning more about the community she studied. She now works for InterIm CDA, a nonprofit focused on community housing development. Even now, you can find Leigh-Anne in the International District running errands and giving neighborhood tours to visitors interested in its historic roots. In her spare time she enjoys listening to the same song on repeat, hot yoga and catching up with family and friends.

 

HalleyHalley Cody was born in South Korea and brought to the United States at 3 months, where she grew up in Seattle. Halley participated in traditional Korean dance in addition to being a serious violin student; playing with the Seattle Youth Symphony and the Seattle Chamber Music Society. After majoring in Anthropology and Political Science at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania, she moved back to Seattle to work for a post-production house specializing in audio and video. She has since transitioned into work at a large law firm. Halley is very passionate about issues concerning feminism, social justice and politics, and plans to pursue these interests at the Evans School of Public Affairs at the University of Washington in the future.

 

HeinHien Dang is Vietnamese-American and has lived in or around Seattle her entire life. She attended the University of Washington and earned a BA in both Geography and Community, Environment and Planning. She interned at the Chinatown-International District Business Improvement Area and has since moved to the Alliance for Pioneer Square where she works to revitalize Seattle’s historic Pioneer Square neighborhood. Hien’s expertise lies in digital communications, using social media, website design, and traditional marketing to connect the public to unique assets of the community. She is also active with the Friends of Little Saigon as a part of the Celebrate Little Saigon planning committee.

LizLiz Dang is Vietnamese-American, born and raised in Seattle. She graduated from the University of Washington with a Bachelor’s degree in Women Studies. Liz values her fluency in the Vietnamese language, as this is a large part of her upbringing. Liz is a passionate advocate and has worked to support women and children who were victims of domestic violence. She currently works for Seattle Goodwill as the Administrative Assistant to the Vice President of the Job Training and Education Programs. She wishes to deepen her community involvement by supporting social justice and enjoys making greeting cards, cooking, and snuggling with her dog, Christmas in her spare time.

 

MikhaliaMikhaila Gonzales was born and raised in New York City but visits family in The Philippines regularly to maintain strong family ties. She studied and traveled in parts of China, Southeast Asia, Africa and Central America while studying International Development and Social Change at Clark University in Massachusetts, and Environmental Science and Policy in graduate school. At Save Habitat and Diversity of Wetlands in Renton, Mikhaila learned the ins-and-outs of grassroots non-profit management– volunteer management, outreach, fundraising and program development. An environmental educator at heart, she is passionate about resource conservation and loves her neighborhood, baking, gardening and hiking.

 

VeasnaVeasna Hoy was born in Cambodia, raised in Olympia and earned her bachelor’s degree in Political Science from Pacific Lutheran University. She studied Asia Pacific Studies as a graduate student and later worked as a university instructor and cabinet assistant for the Royal Government in Cambodia. Veasna previously worked at the Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and now works as a mental health counselor at Southwest Youth and Family Services. She is a contributor to the Washington State AAPI Voices in Education Initiative, the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience and volunteers for the Road Map Project to improve student achievement and college readiness in South King County and South Seattle. On her free time, she enjoys hiking, reading, and lounging around in her, ‘I heart White Center’ t-shirt.

NorikoNoriko Inafuku was born in Okinawa, Japan and moved to Seattle at the age of six with her family. She received her bachelor’s degrees in Sociology and Psychology from the University of Washington in 2007. Noriko has been part of the Okinawa Kenjin Club of Washington State since childhood and enjoys serving the Japanese community in her spare time. She also enjoys watching Japanese drama and variety shows, karaoke, and eating out izakaya style.

XueXue Ma was born in Guangdong, China. She immigrated with her family to Seattle at the age of nine and as the first person in her family to graduate from college, she is paving the way for her two younger siblings to pursue higher education. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from the University of Washington and ended up staying as a Financial Analyst in the Advancement Office. She enjoys traveling, crocheting, and watching TV dramas in her free time. She has studied in Vietnam, Paris, and South Africa and hopes to visit all seven continents before she turns 35. She also plans on obtaining her MBA in the near future.

Community project to connect undocumented Asian Pacific Islander youth with DACA resources

The Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Foundation (ACLF) and 21 Progress announced a partnership to outreach to undocumented Asian Pacific Islander youth to connect them with Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) resources.

While nationally 64 percent of the eligible applicants from Mexico have applied for DACA, the Asian Pacific Islander (API) community has lagged far behind. Only 16 percent of the eligible applicants from the Philippines and 33 percent of the applicants from Korea have applied.

“In Washington state more than 4,000 API eligible youth have yet to apply for DACA,” said Sharon Maeda, Executive Director of 21 Progress. “We need to reach all undocumented youth especially API’s to make them aware and help them take advantage of this opportunity. 21 Progress is excited to work with ACLF to make the American Dream possible for API undocumented youth across the state.”

The ACLF and 21 Progress’ project will:

  • Identify barriers and resources within the Asian Pacific Islander community.
  • Develop a strategic outreach plan to connect with DACA eligible API individuals, community organizations.
  • Build and maintain lasting partnerships.

The project is part of ACLF’s Community Leaders Program (CLP), a six month leadership program that offers training and mentorship to individuals with an interest and passion in social justice and leadership roles in their community. The CLP participants attend bi-monthly workshops and network with community leaders and complete a group project that benefits and contributes to a healthy and vibrant API community.

“ACLF is proud to partner with 21 Progress on this ambitious and much needed project that will benefit the API community,” said Nicole Keenan, ACLF Board Chair. “Too often because of the model minority stereotype the API community is forgotten and seen inaccurately as not needing resources like DACA. This project will connect undocumented API youth with valuable resources and teach ACLF’s CLP participants leadership skills and the importance of community.”

About 21 Progress

21 PROGRESS provides programs that enhance leadership development among the hard working people of Washington, their families, and communities. Through popular education, civic engagement and arts & culture, 21 PROGRESS assists emerging leaders – especially young adults and immigrants – to claim their place in building a more just society and reaching their American Dream.

ACLF and CAPAA Announce 2014 Fellows

ACLF and CAAAPA Logo

The Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs and the Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Foundation are pleased to announce the selection of three 2014 Fellows: Brianne Ramos, Jintana Lityouvong and Kryselle Manzano.

The fellowship, for college juniors, seniors, and graduate students, is an opportunity to build their legislative and public policy analysis skills on issues affecting the Asian Pacific American community. A Fellow, will have the opportunity to participate in ACLF’s Community Leaders Program.

  • Brianne Ramos is a Chamorro-Filipino American born in Guam and raised in Olympia, Washington. She currently attends the University of Washington and will receive her bachelor’s in Medical Anthropology and Global Health with a minor in Diversity.
  • Jintana Lityouvong is the daughter of Laotian American refugees and has lived across the west coast. With past involvements in the International Examiner, the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA), and the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) in Washington D.C, Lityouvong has a passion for working with the API community, for the API community. She is currently a senior at the University of Washington majoring in Culture, Literature and the Arts and has dreams of either writing the great Asian American novel or becoming a political speechwriter.
  • Kryselle Manzano is a 2nd generation Ilocano/a-Filipino/a American born and raised in Southwest Seattle. She graduated from the University of Washington with a degree in American Ethnics Studies with a concentration in Asian American Studies.

To read the press release click here

Apply for the 2013 Community Leaders Program today!

ACLF is now accepting applications to the 2013 Community Leaders Program.   

CLP 2012

Click here to download the 2013 Community Leaders Program application.

For more information visit http://aclfnorthwest.org/clp/

ACLF Mourns Loss of Founder Kip Tokuda

The Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Foundation (ACLF) is greatly saddened by the loss of our founder, community advocate and mentor to countless people in our community Kip Tokuda.

Kip opened his heart and home to countless people and taught them the meaning and importance of social justice, community empowerment and public service. He taught us how to lead with compassion and humility.

His warm smile welcomed many into the Asian Pacific Islander community and his kind words, encouragement and unconditional support helped many achieve their goals and motivated them to serve their community.

Kip’s spirit, passion and vision of an organization that would train, develop and support Asian Pacific Islanders who are committed to social justice were the driving force behind the founding of ACLF in 1999. ACLF and its more than 160 alumni will continue their good work and be inspired by Kip’s memory to advocate for greater economic, social and political justice.

We also extend our deepest condolences to the entire Tokuda family and all those who were fortunate enough to be touched by Kip.

Kip Tokuda

Kip at the 2011 ACLF Summer Social, hosted at his home in Seattle.

ACLF welcomes new board members

ACLF welcomes four outstanding community leaders and Community Leaders Program (CLP) alumni to its Board of Directors.

ACLF will benefit from these community leaders knowledge, expertise and dedication to the Asian Pacific Islander (API) community.  They will increase ACLF’s presence in the community and help us train and support leaders that are committed to social justice, community involvement and empowering and raising the collective voice of the API community.

Randon Aea (CLP alumni 2011)
Randon Aea was born and raised on the island of Oahu in the state of Hawaii. He identifies himself as Native Hawaiian with a mixed heritage of Chinese, English, Irish, German, Spanish, Portuguese, and Filipino. He has worked in the Human Services/Community Mental Health field for the past 16 years. Randon has a background in crisis management where he has provided crisis outreach in King County and taught crisis intervention classes at the community college level. In 2012, Randon completed the Emerging Leaders Program for LEAP (Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics). Currently he works for the Muckleshoot Tribe as the Family and Youth Services Program Manager.

Melissa Atalig (CLP alumni 2012)
Melissa Atalig is a Special Projects Coordinator for Tribal Healthy Homes Northwest. Her varied career includes sustainable planning and development; energy efficiency and emissions reduction; and project management. Since moving to Washington State, she has dedicated her time to environmental justice concerns in Seattle and the Puget Sound region. Over the past year, she worked with the Tulalip Tribes of Washington on improving air quality in the Tulalip Bay airshed. Her passion for promoting equity and social justice for marginalized communities has been demonstrated through her community advocacy work and successful efforts to ensure a better quality of life for vulnerable populations.

Justin Chan (CLP alumni 2011)
Justin Chan, a first generation Taiwanese and a dedicated community leader, currently serves the entire Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community in the State of Washington as the Executive Assistant to the Washington State Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs. Justin has worked with AAPI communities throughout the State by helping to ensure their equitable participation in the fields of business, education and government services. He is a Commissioner on the Seattle Immigrant and Refugee Commission. He also served on the vital procurement committees for the InterIm CDA and the Wing Luke Museum.

Mary McNair (CLP alumni 2011)
Mary works at the University of Washington with the Jump­start pro­gram where she super­vises stu­dents who engage in year-long service-learning oppor­tu­nities at local Head Start cen­ters in Seat­tle. Mary is a life-long Wash­ing­ton res­i­dent who fol­lowed her dream to explore the world and vol­un­teer while serv­ing in the Peace Corps in West Africa and has been engaged in service and leadership roles ever since. From Seattle Works to volunteering for community events and organizations focused on youth, Mary is dedicated to serving others. In 2010, Mary earned her Master’s in Public Administration from the University of Washington Evans School of Public Affairs with a certificate in Non-Profit Management.

 

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